Mother’s Tea, Round Two

Piper had her Mother’s Tea last Friday, a few days after Ellie. It’s quite a different format in the toddler classroom than the primary classroom. The kids helped the teachers make cookies with jam in them and they squeezed the lemons for the lemon tea. We sat on their tiny little stools and had tea with them, played outside in the water trough, did some work and then did circle time. The kids made us these adorable keychains with their pictures in them, which I hung in my car.

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The kids do this little dance individually after circle time before they go outside:

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Going back to Work is Comedy

So this was my third week back at work since having my little Miss Piper bug. I miss her so, but I am definitely pleased with her care arrangement and know she’s in amazing hands, albeit not as amazing as mine! Being at work these weeks has some pretty funny thoughts going through my head, none of which I allow to come out of my mouth, all of which I am happy to share with any curious readers.

Because I’ve been a mom now for over two years, or approximately 6.25% of my life, I’ve started to forget what reality was like prior to having children. I was in a meeting my first day back with a childless single individual and he asked me how things are going being back at work. I told him “I miss my girls so much, but honestly being back at work is a bit of a break compared to the work of being a full time mom.” He looked at me perplexed and said “Why?” In my head I wanted to laugh as hard as I could. And then I remembered I used to be clueless about these types of things too. I always had respect for full time moms and working moms, but I didn’t really KNOW what their life was like. I would never have really thought it was the hardest job in the world. So rather than laugh in his face, I simply said “Being a full time mom is the hardest work ever. There is a human being that cannot leave you for a moment and you never get a break. Even when they sleep there is a lengthy list of things to do and you’re always on their clock.”  Enough said because just like my former self, he probably won’t get it until he has kids.

The other comedic thoughts that run through my head relate to the “mother’s room.” Although these thoughts do not get graphic, if conversations about nursing and pumping gross you out, please stop reading now.  When I returned to work, the first thing on my agenda was to find the Mother’s Room.

Step 1: Find the physical location of the Mother’s Room: check.

Step 2: Try to use the Mother’s Room: UNcheck.

Why is there a lock on the Mother’s Room? How do I obtain a key? So I start asking around. I instant message a mom co-worker: how do I get into the Mother’s Room?!?!

I ask a friend of mine with kids; he’s clueless.

So I go to the handy dandy intranet and find this: “a key to the Mother’s Room must be obtained 10 days in advance.” What?!?! Sorry I’m not better at planning, but the last thing on my mind ten days before I returned to work is how I was going to get access to the room to make bottles for my bug. So I email the alias, apologize for the urgency of the matter, but request a key as quickly as possible because at this point I feel like I just might explode. Luckily the very helpful person on the other end of my email had a key I could pick up right away.

The rooms at my work are really quite nice. There are nice magazines, pictures of fellow employees babies, napkins, permanant markers, a fridge, really everything a gal could need. But I can’t help but think these thoughts in my head:

  1. On my way to the Mother’s Room: “I hope no one knows what this super attractive tote is I’m carrying, but I’m sure everyone does. I especially hope the device inside doesn’t randomly turn on at my desk or as I’m walking to the Mothers Room – I’m pretty sure I would turn bright red and likely spill the entire contents of the bag trying to find the device to turn it off!”
  2. As I walk into or out of the Mothers Room: “I hope no one sees me going in or coming out of this room and if they do I hope they don’t think about what I’m going in there to do. But they probably will think about it…I would. Oh well, gotta do what ya gotta do.”
  3. As I am in the Mothers Room doing my business: “I hope no one can hear what I’m doing in here, but I’m sure they can. I can hear other people when they’re in here. And I hope no one can see through these attractive mini-blinds.”
  4. As I’m leaving the Mothers Room: “Do I have all my clothes on?!?! How embarrassing would it be to accidentally open the door without my shirt on?!?! Or what if I dropped my milk between the Mothers Room and the freezer – that would be mortifying!”

All in all, going back to work is extremely difficult. But I also have the perspective that I’m pretty lucky to have a great job, an understanding boss and a realistic workload. It’s really not fair for me to complain when I was fortunate enough to take four months off and at least I have a job, right? There are lots of people in this world that have more to complain about, so I try to keep my eye on the positives and snuggle with my little munchkins as much as possible during the time I have with them.

Happy Mother’s Day

Today was nice – breakfast by the hubs, long hike in the morning, Mexican food for lunch, nap when we got home, dinner by the hubs.

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The greatest thing about the day was that it was relatively easy. The hike was challenging yes, but Brian took on all of the cleaning and most of the tending to Ellie. I just got to be with them, relax and enjoy the day. 

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As a mom, I find myself frequently thinking about how grateful I am to have the family I do. I know I’m very lucky to have such a supportive husband and such a happy healthy daughter. That doesn’t change the fact that it’s hard sometimes and I definitely have my moments of thinking about the difficulties. I’ve always told people being a mom is actually the toughest job in the world. I’ve never done anything so hard – and impactful. 

Today I found myself thinking a lot about other moms though, moms who haven’t been as lucky. The single moms out there especially deserve an amazing Mother’s Day. These amazing ladies never get a break. They can’t just ask someone else to change the diaper 50% of the times throughout the day. I hope many of them get help from their families and friends, but at the end of the day, I’m certain their job as a mom is much more difficult than mine.

I’ve also seen many moms lately with kids who were likely born with disabilities or health problems. I think about what it would be like to be in their shoes and I conclude with the thought that there is no way I could imagine what it’s like. I just know it must take a lot of courage, time, and compassion and I respect those moms enormously. 

The other group of moms I’ve been thinking a lot about are those who are “alternative” moms, those who can’t have children of their own. I think about the incredible rolls many of them will play in the lives of children who are less fortunate or of animals who have never had a home filled with love. 

At the end of the day, the thing that bonds all of us moms is the love in our hearts and the fact that we have challenges every day and blessings every day. It’s a group I’m honored to be a part of and grateful for every day, especially today.

ImageEllie hanging out with the cousins yesterday.

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Showing her curiosity – climbing in and out of things is her favorite pastime.